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. tell us what's going on and what is your take? >> guest: china has developed this air defense identification, which the administration has told our military plane to ignore, that the faa to bring into effect. so if you're on a commercial airliner you have to take this into account. you've got to respond -- i'm not sure how that works, probably transponders, but our military side is not recognizing it. china will try to -- they'll try to exert itself over japan and our allies in that region, and i think we all knew this was something. we've been talking on china since i've been in congress the last five years and wanted to expand and that's what's happening right now. what i think will happen is they will push further and further and further, every time, and this is once again much harder than the iran deal because china is a big old over american debt, a huge part of our economy. and they're becoming more westernized while at the same time building up their military and building their military up in a way where it's purely targeted at the american military. they are not doing
defense relations. and let me in particular welcome you to csis' new home here at 1616 rhode island avenue. i'm kathleen hicks, henry a. kissinger chair and director of the international security program here at csis, and i'm very pleased to have the honor of introducing today's guest speaker, and this is the chief of defense staff of canada, general lawson. he's had a long and distinguished career serving in his current position since october 2012. prior to his most recent promotion, he served as deputy commander at norad which is at peterson air force base this colorado, so he is no stranger to the importance of u.s./canadian defense cooperation. he has also held such distinguished positions as assistant chief of the air staff and commandant of the royal military college in kingston. he led the stand up of the strategic joint staff and has served as command oring officer -- commanding officer of 412 squadron based in ottawa. general lawson graduated from the military college of canada with a bachelor of science degree as well as a master of science in the electrical can engineering and w
and for coming tonight. [applause] held a conference on defense related topics recently including the iran nuclear deal, u.s. budget negotiations and the military's upcoming withdrawal from afghanistan. one of the participants was forwarded to provide official michelle flournoy. bumiller elisabeth of "the new york times" moderated this discussion. >> thank you all for coming. and i'm sorry that i am not nick, but here i am and i'm pulling myself together. i'm going to briefly introduce michele and phillip. we were all at aspen and i see a table h of these could number of people in the audience that were in considerably better weather last summer. so, michelle flournoy is the senior adviser at the boston consulting group prayer. from 2009 to 2012 she was the undersecretary for defense policy. and then she was the principle advisor to the secretary defense and the violation of the national security defense policies and oversight of military plans and operations and so forth. i interviewed her a number of times. she was very cautious. she never told us very much. she's also a senior fellow fo
, our commitment to israel's security spurred the u.s.-israeli development of missile defense technologies to keep israelis safe from rockets and missiles. those systems and newer technologies continue to protect israelis from the range of threats that they still face today. president obama and i -- and i think you heard this from the president in his q&a earlier today -- remain deeply committed. indeed determined to ensuring israel has the ability to defend itself by itself. that is why in fact, by any measurement, president obama's administration has done more than any before to make israel more secure, including funding iron dome, which i saved untold -- which has saved untold lives by intercepting hundreds of rockets that might otherwise have struck schools, hospitals, or homes. deepening our day-to-day security on an ongoing basis. negotiating a new, long-term memorandum of understanding to lock in long-term military assistance for the future. providing access to the most sophisticated u.s. military technology, such as precision munitions, the f-35 joint strike fighter, t
defenses. he said israel would need strong ties throughout the middle east . he wrote as much in the israel i declaration of independence. promoting bonds of cooperation with israel's neighbors. that did not happen right away, of course, but israel has always known it is strongest when it extends its hand in peace, when it is in the high moral ground. that is why the declaration of independence of israel went on to state from day one that israel would "do its share in a common effort for the advancement of the entire middle east." the entire middle east. that was the vision of the founding fathers. now, i understand that some think the current upheaval in the region makes this an inopportune time to try for peace, but i happen to agree with what prime minister netanyahu wrote in a rather remarkable open letter to the citizens of israel that he wrote in the beginning of these negotiations. he wrote that the dawn of a new era in the region is exactly the right time to recast israel's relationships and to change the narrative with a new generation that is starting to make its voice is heard --
government agencies, among them nih and the defense advanced research project agency and the national science foundation as well as private partners to take our understanding of the brain and how it works and bring it up a notch. try to figure out a way to develop the tools to decode the language of the brain. we have gone a long way recently, but we knew -- need to go much further much faster to understand the basis of how the brain works and how it sometimes does not work so well so that you end up with a brain that gives you alzheimer's or parkinson's or any of those disorders that were mentioned earlier. those are disorders that if you are going to really be able to make the kind of progress we want, we have got to understand the fundamentals of the organ involved. we do not understand the brain as well as we understand the heart, kidney, or the liver. the association hopes to put the brain into the focus of current research so we can really up the understanding of this organ and be able to make a difference for people with brain disorders. host: with regard to alter them are specifically
>> we announced these changes than the secretary of defense, general dempsey said it will result in better aligning our structures and resources with dod strategic interests and priorities. and earlier this year we directed the management review in that review developed options to help the dod plan for a range of future budget scenarios, including the persistence of sequester lover untracked level cuts. and as all of you know, these threats, and less changed, will represent a 500 billion-dollar reduction over the next 10 years, and that is in addition with a $480 billion spending cut that the dod has are implemented. included in the strategic choice of management review is a comprehensive look that all savings that could be achieved by reducing overhead throughout the department and streamlining organizations, including osd and the joint staff. as you may recall, i announced this summer that dod would reduce headquarters operating budgets for 20 represent over the next five years and these reductions are only a first step in the effort of dod to realign the spending to meet new f
to the senate floor today to update members on the status of the national defense authorization act for fiscal year 2014. before the break, we spent a week on the senate floor trying to bring more amendments up and to have them debated and voted on, but we were unable to do so. we tried to reach agreement to limit consideration to defense-related amendments, but we were unable to do that. we trade to get consent to vote on two sexual assault amendmen s that had been fully debated but we could not get that accident. -- get that consent. we tried to get consent to lock in additional votes but we were unable to do so. at this point, mr. president, the house of representatives will be adjourning for the year at the end of this week. and there is simply no way that we can debate and vote on those amendments to the pending bill, to get cloture, to pass the bill, to go to conference with the house, to get a conference report written and to have it adopted by the house of representatives all before the house goes out of session this friday. there just simply is no way that all of those events can take
2014 for military activities of the department of defense and so forth and for other purposes. the presiding officer: the senator from michigan. mr. levin: before me left for the thanksgiving break, senator inhofe and i said that we would come to the senate floor today to update members on the status of the national defense authorization act for fiscal year 2014. before the break, we spent a week on the senate floor trying to bring more amendments up and to have them debated and voted on, but we were unable to do so. we tried to reach agreement to limit consideration to defense-related amendments, but we were unable to do that. we trade to get consent to vote on two sexual assault amendmen s that had been fully debated but we could not get that accident. -- get that consent. we tried to get consent to lock in additional votes but we were unable to do so. at this point, mr. president, the house of representatives will be adjourning for the year at the end of this week. and there is simply no way that we can debate and vote on those amendments to the pending bill, to get cloture
thing completely likely to get through it is a new defense authorization act. there will be a lot of interesting debates to watch on that to see what gets included. one thing we will watch is to see whether any legislation sanctioning iran is added to the bill. the administration is doing everything it can to prevent congress from doing that, but a lot of members are still interested in adding sanctions, sending signals they are not interested in the deal obama wants to sign onto. also the farm bill. negotiators are trying to reach an agreement. if they cannot get a deal, they will have to at least extend existing spending so that is something that can be done. the senate is here for an extra week. they will look at a lot of nominations, particularly after the filibuster changes that democrats rammed through a few weeks ago. among the big nominees to watch for are the new chairwoman of the federal reserve, janet yellen. host: a number of articles in the last couple of weeks have suggested that this is the most unproductive covers ever. why has this year been so hard to get into an
be enacted in our nation's defense department. we haven't even got an audit of the defense department. year after year after year we demand that an audit be conducted by the department of defense by a certain year, and it's never happened. and so we're not apologists. in fact, i believe that the chairman and ranking member have been zealous in their efforts to reduce waste and mismanagement and duplication in the armed services, in the defense department through their work on the armed services committee. but the morale of our men and women who are serving is being harmed, and it's not something that shows up in dollars and cents. but it does show up over time. i would ask the senator from michigan, it does show up over time in their willingness to remain in the military. i was recently down at fort campbell, kentucky, with the senator from tennessee, senator alexander, and we had an excellent briefing from the colonels and the generals, and the chief master sergeants of the united states army there. and unanimous, unanimous was their view that they believe that we in the congress of the un
sponsored the patrick leahy law and that prohibits the department of state and defense to provide military aid to foreign military and police forces that engage and violate human rights. and he never stops leading on an issue central to our mission at human rights first and that is refuge protection. and the act he sponsors elimina eliminates them from not having safe places to go. in 2009, he called for the creation of an independent investigation for torture after 9-11. he is a determined pragmatic person and an idealist who is less interested in making statements than change. he is willing and able to work with republicans on human rights and/or other -- and other issues -- he and rubio are trying to get the trafficking victims protection act. patrick leahy is now the longest serving u.s. senate and he is president pro-term of the senate. don't tell him that, because he thinks, and i think all of us in the room know it is true, that he is just getting started. ladies and gentlemen, i hope you will give a warm welcome to our keynote speaker, the honorable patrick leahy. [ applause ] >> t
for the defense and intelligence communities that would seem to be indicated by the kinds of policies congressman rogers would like to see the united states follow? the middle of budget negotiations. it would be great if we can get an agreement by next week. right now, it is up in the air. question, i think when it comes to providing the resources necessary for the defense and intelligence community, there is a bipartisan support for that part of the budget. with respect to other very important parts of our national security budget, we have had less success in convincing our republican colleagues. the other parts of what i think are important to a robust policy which includes other forms of ofistence, development -- assistance, development and economic assistance. other tools of former -- foreign policy. the state department budget is puny in comparison to the defense budget. you get an awful lot of benefit from some of those investments that the state department, in terms of assistance, economic assistance and it is that part of the category of the budget where we have had a lot less success in
, there are standing meetings for the secretary of defense, state, and the treasury this president has, but he meets with other secretaries in one on ones and small groups all the time. i would note that those calendars may never show a meeting i have with the president. i had two yesterday. that is how it works. >> a final question on nelson mandela. what people will be thinking about, when we consider the life of nelson mandela and the challenges that exist in our own country, what lessons can washington learn? i know you had conversations in the white house and what you think the message we can learn is. >> i think the president put it very well yesterday in the remarks he made when he was in south africa earlier this year about the remarkable example that nelson mandela set when he was released from prison and made clear that he would embrace those who jailed him, and he would seek those to help build a south africa that judged every person by his or her character and not by his or her skin color. i think that spirit of reconciliation that the president said yesterday is one that should imbue th
. the motion is agreed to. the clerk will report the nomination. the clerk: department of defense, debra lee james virginia, to be secretary of the air force. mr. reid: i send a cloture motion to the desk. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the cloture motion. the clerk: cloture motion. we the undersigned senators in accordance with the provisions of rule 22 of the standing rules of the senate hereby move to bring to a close the debate on the nomination of deborah lee james of virginia to be secretary of the air force signed by 19 senators as follows. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent the reading of the names be waived. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. reid: i move to proceed to legislative session. the presiding officer: the question is on the motion to proceed. all those in favor say aye. all those opposed say nay. the ayes appear to have it. the ayes do have it. the motion is agreed to. mr. reid: i move to proceed to executive session to consider calendar number 444. the presiding officer: the question is on the motion to proceed. all those in favor say aye. all tho
. some contend that the president's decision not to defend the defense of marriage act violated the clause and in fact the president made a judgment subsequently vindicated by the united states supreme court that the act was unconstitutional. but while the case was pending, he continued to comply with the law. the president's decision not to defend the law wasn't novel and indeed the congress itself recognized this possibility. congress understood that sometimes the administration's duty to take care that the law be faithfully executed might include recognizing that a particular statute is unconstitutional. the constitution as we are told is the supreme law of the land. presidents are required to follow it. so past administrations have exercised their discretion not to defend the law they have deemed unconstitutional. for example, the acting solicitor general at the time, john roberts, now the chief justice of the united states refused to defend the law that he believed to be unconstitutional in the case of natural broadcasting versus the fcc. chief justice roberts argued that t
's role and authority, show you a portion of the defense department briefing from yesterday with remarks from defense secretary chuck hagel and joint chiefs chair general martin dempsey on pentagon spending cuts. >> all these decisions will not only result in a smaller and flatter osd but one that i believe will be better prepared for serious and complex 21st century security challenges that we face as a department and as a nation. and is constrained budget environment, we will continue to look for ways to reduce overhead, improve efficiency and maximize combat power. but we must do so in a deliberate manner after careful consideration of how best to ensure this department is able to carry out its mission of defending the nation. most of the reduction in osd staff that i've announce today will occur through process of natural attrition in order to minimize the impact on workforce. if the department is forced to take this deep sequestration cuts on the order of $500 billion over the next 10 years, we may need to include additional reductions. as i said before, sequestration is irresponsib
in an effort to support the recovery effort that is being waged by the department of defense and earlier this year, i led a bi-partisan delegation with my good friend to the philippians to strengthen our bilateral relationship with the company. we will do that again in the wake of the interest. but in the interirks -- interim -- i want to say we are all filipinos at this time. >> thank you for your leadership and comments. i would like to recognize mr. minnow now. >> thank you for calling the hearing. as we start to look at the issues, the personal first-hand testimony of uand/ors who have visit -- and/or others -- who vis visited the region you cannot help but feel for those who have been displaced. the size of the state of oregon has been displaced. if everybody in oregon was displaced it would be monumental in terms of impact. in a town where we can be critical many times of agencies and their roll and what happened, the testimony that has been shared by mr. green and the chairman is certainly something that needs to be applauded and we need to celebrate the successes and hopefully pu
that the decision not to defend the defense of marriage act violated the take care clause. in fact, the president made a subsequently vindicated by the united states supreme that the act was unconstitutional. pending, hese was continued to comply with the law. decision not to defend the law was not novel. indeed, congress itself recognized this possibility. congress understood that sometimes the administration's duty to take care that the laws be faithfully executed might include recognizing that a particular statute is unconstitutional. the constitution is as we are article 6 of the constitution, the supreme law of the land. presidents are required to follow it. past administrations have discretion not that they have deemed unconstitutional. example, the acting solicitor general at the time, roberts, now the chief justice of the united states, refused to defend a law that he unconstitutional in the 1990 case of metzer broadcasting versus the fcc. chief justice roberts argued providing for minority preferences in broadcasting was unconstitutional. despite supreme court resident cedent, he argued
and chris hill went into see him, and i was sent in to see the defense minister also known as the pizza man because he had become welcome in canada with a chain of pizza restaurants, and so it was darg in the ministry of defense, and we know where the front line is, that we were told from the previous day, and we walk in and tell the minister the instructions are from the united states that you must stop and stop the forces right now. we said, ambassador holbrook is giving this to the president right now. they said, stop, stop, we're on the last hill overlooking, and the seshes going crazy shooting their own soldiers who are running from us. you want us to stop right now? we said, stop right now. we get back in the plane, and so dick said stop, and we told them to stop, jim and i, and we say, but look, did we know it was this bad? it was this bad, so, you know, we're scrambling to get the intelligence information to put it together. i guess dick finally got, you know, got the word it was bad. he said, we should go right now and tell him to surrender right now. we can save his unit, right no
that needs to be done. the majority leader knows that will be our position. do not see the defense authorization bill. i am hopeful the senate will move on that intelligence authorization. the senate has passed comprehensive immigration reform will. we are very disappointed on this side of the aisle that the senate bill has not been put on the floor. our bill or one of the four bills out of committee. it was supported by the republican party and the judiciary committee. they have not been brought to the floor. we believe immigration reform is a critically important action for the congress to take. we hope anyone of those options would be brought to the table. the senate has passed in a bipartisan way the end of discrimination in employment. we talk about jobs. we talk about economic opportunity. passed that bill. that is not on the agenda either. i noticed we do have an extension bill that has been specifically reference. we will get to a debate on that next week. we have a suspension bill we have been urging that is reported out of committee that passed by 350 votes. it simply say
of the philippines and in support of the recovery effort being waged now by usaid and the department of defense and earlier this year, i lead a bipartisan delegation with my good friend, ranking member, to the philippines to strengthen our bilateral relationship with that country. we're going do that again in the wake of these issues. but in the interim, i want to thank all the members of the committee and to say we are all filipinos during this difficult time. i look forward to hearing from our distinguished witness. >> thank you for your leadership and comment today. i would like to recognize -- >> thank you, mr. chairman. and thank you for calling this hearing and as we start to look at the issue, and a personal firsthand testimony you and others who visited the region. it's certainly one that can't help but touch your heard when you hear about people being displaced tps. whard we start talking in millions to really recognize the size of that. but it's the size of the state of oregon. if everybody in oregon were displaced, you know, it's just monumental in term of the impact. so i think in
criteria is. and the more i talk to prosecutor and defense attorneys the more they tell me in the pretrial face in plea bargaining increasingly the evidence is being used to try to plea for a lesser offense or alesser punishment. in what ways? well, the firsts most pef lent is in cases offed had. right. in death penalty cases that's where the evidence first showed up. in the sentencing face of a capital case, a criminal defendant tried to present as mitigating evidence that they should be treatedless harsh. they shouldn't get the death penalty. what is surprising if you look at the chart there are many other types on here. okay. from felon murder, child abuse, rape case, drug case, across the gamete of felony cases now, criminal defendants are coming to the courtroom and introducing evidence there genetic or brain help to explain why they behave the way that did. the blue in the front and red in the back shows you that the majority of these cases are now becoming neurological cases. it's gettic evidence. the red bar in the back is neurological evidence. what this is with a kind of claim ar
necessary to pass it. >> just before the thanksgiving break, the senate was working on the defense authorization bill. our those going? >> they thought they were going to vote in the senate. it could drag into the new year. >> with the filibuster rules changed because of the nuclear option, where judicial nominations can we expect to see? >> three nominees to the d c circuit court, one of the most powerful in the country that deals in disputes between the executive and legislative branch. , harry reid said he will bring those to the floor. quicklylikely move very in the beginning of the week for the senate. >> a congressional reporter for politico. thank you for joining us. hillary received a human rights award earlier today, an advocacy group founded by tom lantos. he was a holocaust survivor. this is about 15 minutes. [applause] my goodness. thank you. thank you very much. thank you. thek you, and first to extraordinary lantos family, this is a great honor and an havese personal leisure to tom lantos around my neck. office or onin my asking me what i was going to do about somethi
:00 for general speeches, legislative work starts at 4:00, and they'll be working on 2014 defense programs. at 5:00 today judicial nominations for the u.s. circuit court of appeals for d.c., the first nomination taken up since the senate changed its filibuster rules just before thanksgiving break, and they may also take up a house bill to extend a ban on plastic guns. >>> and we've got more from capitol hill reporter on what the legislative agenda looks like for this week. >> host: joining us now to talk about some of these issues on capitol hill in the week ahead is ian swanson, news editor at "the hill" newspaper. thanks for joining us this morning. >> guest: thanks for having me. >> host: and as "the washington post" stated, we're expecting a budget deal as early as in this week. what could that deal look like? >> guest: well, it's not going to be the grand bargain that really has dominated discussions over the last three, four or five years. negotiators are looking at any tax hikes which have been demanded by democrats. tear also not looking at significant cuts to medicare, medicaid or socia
on the annual legislation authorizing defense programs and debate and a roll call vote on a judicial nomination. >> representatives from iran and six world powers will meet in vienna this week for the next round of talks concerning iran's nuclear program. we'll have analysis of the ongoing negotiations at an event hosted by the center for strategic and international studies. speakers include former national security adviser brzezinski and new york times columnist tom friedman. cbs news "face the nation" anchor bob schieffer will moderate the event. that gets underway at 5:30 p.m. eastern over on c-span3. >> next, a look at the future of the republican party from political strategist and cnn contributor ana navarro. she talks about changes and demographics require the party to broaden its base with. she also comments on the current divisions within the party and who she thinks are the best potential candidates for winning back the white house in 2016. she spoke last month at a forum hosted by the new hampshire institute of politics at saint anselm college in manchester. this is a little over an
. totally bipartisan about it provided funding for houses of worship, many who are the front-line defense in terms of humanitarian aid in new york and new jersey ravaged by super storm sandy. the bill passed. fema opposes it. the senate has opposed it and refuses to even bring it up for a vote. i can't tell you have disappointed and outrageously wrong i think those who were first and foremost in the relief side, being told you're not going to get fema relief. there's a separation of church and date issued. they can do all kinds of other things, but they can't get the critical fema support. that bias, which i know you don't share needs to be guarded against because that first line of defense is so important. mr. green and i would be in agreement. the more you can help out in that regard, the better. thank you. i'd like to now welcome our second panel began with mr. shawn callahan, chief operating officer for catholic relief services. he's also served as executive vice president for overseas operations and regional director for south asia and catholic relief services. he's the crs regional
new acting deputy secretary of defense. i recommended her to the president because i felt we needed the continuity to continue with some of the most exciting challenges we have been facing him and will continue to face in this department over aid member of the ears. you know, what those are. budget sequestration, we are finishing up the review and how all that impacts the strategic interest and focus of where we go from here. she brings the continuity and leadership and highly respected in the congress, in the white house and around here. i want to acknowledge heard coming over to you give us her time. a few months ago she thought she would escape. she did for a while. she will be an important part how rico for work over the next few months. i have great confidence and i vote for virtues' spending time with her again. this morning we laid out the back steps for the next few weeks. also want to take the opportunity to say ash carter we had a ceremony and he will be greatly missed. i will miss him personally and has been a tremendous part of this institution's over the last five year
rebel group during his tenure as the ministry of defense. he ultimately entered politics and perhaps he will tell us all why he made a career change in rows to be present at columbia in 2010. he was elected for four-year term extending until august 2014 obtaining more than 9 million votes, the highest amount obtained by any candidate in the history of colombian democracy. two weeks ago he announced he will run for re-election in next year's presidential election saying he wants to be able to finish the peace process he started. president sub two campaigned in 2010 on a platform to carry on the offensive against the leftist guerrillas that have waged war against the government for decades. as president however he opened talks with the revolutionary armed forces of colombia or farc. negotiators reached a draft agreement on november 6 as 1 aspect of the talks and we expect president santos will tell us about the negotiations in the chances for an ultimate peace agreement. the peace negotiations could well be a central issue in next year's elections with one leading opponent calling for an
the russians have a defensive interest and if there is an explosion in the middle east, it will spread throughout the region and that money may involve saying goodbye, but it could unite the muslims in russia. another interest is to restore some of russia's influence which several decades ago was much larger. and i think russia wants to keep a foot in it and they are not prepared to expel america from the middle east in a dramatic effort, because they can't do to the expectations. so we have russia playing a game in which some games are possible. and this includes engaging russia in the top level of decision-making. >> how do you see a? do you see greater russian engagement than a decade ago? if so, to what end? >> i see greater russian engagement than a year ago. and he is the prime minister of turkey, the prime minister of israel, the chief of saudi intelligence, russian foreign and defense ministry and we are talking to plus two talks and that is incredible in context. and in the paradox is is that it's not being by moscow and the position taken on syria and this includes a willingn
historic legislation appropriately known as the lady law that prohibits the department of defense from providing military aid to a foreign military enforces setting gauge its human-rights a and he'd never stops leaving gandhi issued to our mission with said chief sponsor of the act to eliminate useless hurdles for persecuting refugees to receiving a safe haven will also t. buckley senator leahy to fight counterterrorism problems problems, policies that respect human rights. id 2009 he called for the creation of the independent commission to investigate our own government's use of torture in the post 9/11 era. unfortunately that has not come to pass yet. senator leahy has a strong record of success because he is a turret blown dash determined pragmatist and a the lists less interested in making a statement and making change. and working with republicans on human rights for example, him and senator rubio are in the process to try to get the reauthorization of the trafficking victims' protection act. want to close by sharing a little secret patrick leahy is now one disserving u.s. senator
china the air defense identification zone. provocative to be a attempt to unilaterally contain east chinaquo in the sea. that increases the risk of miscalculation. and e consulting coordinating closely with japan, the republic of korea and our allies in the region. china announced the adiz. newly announced diz even though it overlapped with the adizs and includes japan.ry administered by we do not accept the legitimacy requirements for newly declared adiz and china caused confusion the increase of the accidents underlines the need rescind the procedures. and our actions have demonstrated, we believe these provocations are and e risks of provocation we don't accept the legitimacy of what china announced. we're holding important meetings. > carrying that specific message you just had directly to the chinese leaders? >> yes. that with the re regulation of the civilian aircraft. identify and go to the the china has now requested even though it does not recognize and consider adiz invalid? >> for safety and security of passengers, u.s. carriers operating internationally perate consistent
that the court was going to accept the legal defense fund was going to win. i knew a fair amount about that, but what i did know was that he -- what i didn't know was that he was one of the greatest trial attorneys of his time as well. he spent enormous amounts of time crisscrossing especially the states of the south, representing a wide variety of people, but mostly in criminal cases and very frequently in capital cases. being subjected to incredible danger himself. he would come to town and it was not at all clear that he was going to be safe and of course the indignities of traveling in a place where you couldn't stay at a hotel and you couldn't eat at a regular restaurant. and then representing black people before all-white juries where it was not clear that anybody had justice in mind. the stories that he told of those trips and of those cases, it all came back to me very much this summer. i read a very fine book, and that just one the pulitzer prize called "devil in the grove" about one of his capital cases in florida. it is a gripping story. it reads like a whodunit or what is going
because of the threat of serb intervention so i was sent in to see the defense minister, the pizza man. he had become wealthy on pizza restaurants. we walked in, we were told from the previous day, the instructions are you must stop those forces right now. we said ambassador holbrooke is giving this right now. stop, stop, we are on the west hills, the serbs are going crazy, they are shooting their own soldiers who are running from us. you want us to stop right now? stop right now so we get back in the plane, so dick has said stop, and we say look, did we know it was this bad? we are scrambling to get intelligence information to put it together. dick finally got the word that it was bad. we should go to slow but on milosevic right now and tell him to surrender right now. we can save his units. this is the moment. we need to go to italy, we detoured back and got into belgrade at 2:00 at night and already had dinner. we are in the sedan with the u.s. ambassador and we say to the u.s. ambassador, i can't believe we will see him this late at night, heavy dinners with all these meets and everyth
people who have been mortally wounded in defense of this nation. it is hard to see them and not believe that we are doing -- that we have an obligation to continue to do the right thing. what i am trying to do in taking my clerks to gettysburg in a small way is to think about lincoln and that horrible war, the carnage that took place at gettysburg. think of all the animals that were killed, all of the human beings, all of the destruction that had occurred there. and he comes there three or four months later, november 19, to dedicate a 4-minute speech or whatever it was, and the things that he said, the eloquence of it to elevate that tragic moment, and what i am trying to get these kids to understand, after they see a term, after they see the imperfections, that they still believe. that they are still idealistic. even with the reality, they still believe that this is important and they understand why. so we go, yes, and i drag them across the battlefield. i do not feel all that bad about it. the point is simply to pull it all back together after you see how the sausage is made. that you
going to uphold the defense of marriage act or it isn't. you can look at the votes and what the justices said about why they did what they did, it's right there in front of you and you can say, whereas you might question the motives of somebody in the cabinet department why they did something or didn't, and it would help to have sources and be independent and question them, you can see what antonin scalia said right there. you can look at his reasoning and challenge him on that because he's putting it right out in front of you. so that's one difference i think, one danger that doesn't really exist in the supreme court is becoming beholden to the institution in a way that the things you. >> to justices follow press coverage? >> yes. they do. they try to pretend like they don't, but we know that they read scotusblog. i don't know how many of them watch nbc news or read what tony writes about them, or read what "the new york times" writes about them. but yes, of course they do. >> i think they care about their press. we have heard from them come as amy mentioned. if we have written somethin
tensions. >> guest: china has developed an air defense identification which the administration has told our military to ignore and the faa to bring into effect so if you run a commercial airliner you have to take this into account and respond to the chinese. i'm not sure exactly how that works. our military side is not recognizing that. china will try to resort itself in the south china sea. i think we all knew this was happening. they wanted to expand and that is what is happening right now. they are going to push further and a little bit further and a little bit further. every time and this is once again much harder than the iran deal. there's a huge part of our economy and they are becoming more westernized and mort capitalistic while at the same time our military in building the military up and away where it's purely targeted at the american military. they are building their military up in a protective way against everybody. they are building specific weapon systems that would take out america -- >> host: how should the united states respond? >> guest: by not recognizing it read the def
. >> so in the public interest defense is not actually journalism, that he didn't have the time or resources going through them. >> there were conversations at the cabinet after terry, which led me to think that it was wise to share this material. they attended by herself. how many people read their? >> i think two or three from "the guardian." >> you just broke up, is that right? >> it's harder to smash up a computer you might be. the food mixers -- [inaudible] >> if you have the documents anyway to publish them. >> well, it goes back to spy catcher. i was completely clear what the cabinet secretary that there were copies elsewhere and that the destruction of these computers does not plan to stop reporting. i think that they still had with her instructions. i think that i accept this as a hard choice for the government. i think they were balancing a free press for security. i understand the nature, but the point was i think the alternative to having newspapers , you can criminalize newspapers that you like. the next edward snowden, the next chelsea manning will coach newspapers
, which prohibits the u.s. department of state department of state and department of defense from providing military aid to foreign military and police forces and engage them byerly human rights. and he never stopped bleeding on an issue central to our mission at human rights first and then his refugee protection. he is the chief sponsor of the refugee protection act, which would eliminate useless hurdles that prevent persecuted refugees from receiving safe haven. at human rights first, with also teamed up to senator leahy to fight for counterterrorism problems -- counterterrorism policies that respect human rights. in fact, in 2009, he called for the creation of an independent commission to investigate our own government's use of torture in the post-9/11 era. unfortunately, that hasn't come to pass yet. senator leahy has a strong record of success because he is further determined pragmatist and an idealist who's less interested in making a statement in making change. frankly, he's willing and able to work with republicans on human rights and a whole bunch of other issues. for exa
will turn to a bill for 2014 defense programs. they will take up the judicial nomination for the d.c. circuit with a vote at 5:30 p.m. it will be the first nomination both since they changed the rule since leaving before break. >> now to talk about some of these issues on capitol hill and the week ahead is excellence ane news editor at the hill newspaper. thanks for joining us.u for joit >> host: thanks for having. as the "washington post" state and a number of reports have put out we are expecting a budgeted to come as early as this week. what could that look like? >> guest: is not going to be thi the grand bargaining guest: it is not going to be the grand bargain that has dominated the discussion over the past five years. hikes.looking at tax they are also not looking at significant cuts to medicare, security,or social which are areas republicans say needs to be done. instead we are looking at pretty small things and haggling over whether to have federal employees attribute more to their retirement -- employees contribute more to their retirement plans. thingse also looking at --
powerful economy in the world is not immune from the consequences of defense in the global economic system, so forcefully articulated recently by your own indicates to us that we will have an understanding here in washington. it adds to our confidence that the united states will be in the forefront of the support of africa's struggle to bring about nations. expect to be granted again the privilege of addressing again the representatives of the united states of america. i am grateful to have been allowed to do so in the last months of my public life. the challenges of the present time for our countries, our continent and the world are greater than those have already overcome. we face the future with confidence. because, in spite of the difficulties and tensions that confront us, there is in all of us the capacity to touch one another's hearts across oceans and continents. the award with which you honor me today is an expression of the , one person to , ander, nation to nation people of the north the people of the south. i received with pride as a symbol of hardship for peace, equity as wend
things. the f.b.i. did not get ahold of any samples from texas, but the department of defense did for exactly what hank said, namely to look at the frequency of d.n.a., and because that was said to be forensic, the investigative reporter thought that it was going into a database. i emailed her and could not persuade her otherwise despite the fact it was very clear. >> i will accept the friendly amendment. >> but i want to raise an even broader issue of something we were talking about with the king case. i always come back to the same things. and namely, what's the difference between being arrested and not being arrested? a lot of people get arrested. it's estimated that, what is it, 20%, 30% of the population, more than that, is going to be rested. is there a real difference? i have written with my more provocative moments with some colleagues that maybe we ought to consider having at the stage the onatal testing done, genetic test for the code, not done by the police, uploaded to a database for use in the future. the law enforcement would never see all the genetic information tha
was going on in this bosnia. and we had there in their balkan task force the cia, the defense intelligence agency, the nsa, the joint chiefs of staff regularly working together. sandy chaired a tenty's committee -- deputy's committee that kept all the agencies working together. we were committed to sharing information, not hoarding it, to try to reconcile the apparent inconsistencies and then to make good decisions. you know, i love all these shows, homeland and all that stuff. i love that stuff. [laughter] but the real world involves all these cia folks out there killing themselves to figure out what is really going on and how to get that back to the oil makers. to the policymakers. and what leon says is right, you have to be an active, not passive consumer of intelligence. otherwise, someone just assumes that your bandwidth has been choked in 1994 and '95, and you wind up like we were, not even having a meeting about rwanda. because you're so obsessed with all this other stuff. so the obligation of the policymakers is to be aggressive in this saying what we need. i also agree with the co
of the question. can you talk about the obligation of the president to defend defense of marriage act replace it to be unconstitutional? >> yes. i think -- i agree that the president should only very, very rarely and with extremely good reason declined to defend a law in court. and i've written about that, and i think it's hard to fault with the president did in the case of doma. he concluded with very good recent there was simply no argument that could justify, justify doma. he notified the congress of this decision. he continued to enforce the he invited congress to intervene in litigation to present at that point of view. and ultimate the supreme court vindicated his judgment. so it seems to me it's very difficult to complain -- to blame everyone on all sides of these debates, and in both parties agree is that it contemplates the president may decline to enforce a law which he concludes in a responsible it is unconstitutional. >> the gentleman's time has expired. spent i ask unanimous consent to introduce into the record the letter i refer to. >> without objections order. the gentleman fro
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